Tag Archives: Republican

79% Say U.S. Economy Could Collapse

The latest Fox News poll finds that 79 percent of voters think it’s possible the nation’s economy could collapse, including large majorities of Democrats (72 percent), Republicans (84 percent) and independents (80 percent) and majorities don’t think elected officials in Washington have ideas for fixing it.

Just 18 percent are fools who believe the economy is “so big and strong it could never collapse.”

Moreover, 78 percent of voters believe the federal government is “larger and more costly” than it has ever been before, and by nearly three-to-one more voters think the national debt (65 percent) is a greater potential threat to the country’s future than terrorism (23 percent).

Who has a plan for dealing with the economy? Overall, 35 percent of voters have their heads up their ass and think the Obama administration has a clear plan for fixing the economy. This is down from 42 percent last summer (July 21-22, 2009). So, it looks like the American people are beginning to wake up.

At the same time, the number saying the White House doesn’t have a plan for the economy has increased from 53 percent in July to 62 percent in the new poll. That includes almost all Republicans (88 percent), two-thirds of independents (67 percent), as well as a third of Democrats (33 percent).

Even fewer people think Democrats in Congress (24 percent) and Republicans in Congress (16 percent) have clear plans to fix the economy. The self centered Congress just passed ObanaCare which will make the economy worse.

There is a large gap in party support, as Democrats (46 percent) are significantly more likely than Republicans (25 percent) to think their party has a strategy for the economy. That is not too surprising, is it? Democrats lost touch with reality a long time ago.

The national telephone poll was conducted for Fox News by Opinion Dynamics Corp. among 900 registered voters from March 16 to March 17. For the total sample, the poll has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

“These results reveal a deep anxiety about the fragility of our economy, as voters face continued uncertainty about jobs and an expanding commitment to public sector spending,” said Ernest Paicopolos, a principal of Opinion Dynamics.

Three in 10 American voters (30 percent) say they are comfortable with the size and unconstitutional role of the federal government right now, while 65 percent say the government has become too big and “is restricting American freedoms.”

Sizable majorities of Republicans (84 percent) and independents (74 percent) think the government is too big, while just over half of Democrats (51 percent) are okay with the size of government. Of course that is to be expected. Democrats are socialists. A socialist never thinks the government is too big.

States’ Rights Is Rallying Cry for Lawmakers

One Man’s Thoughts Has Moved To

http://www.patriotthoughts.com

You can read this article at:

http://www.patriotthoughts.com/2010/03/24/states%E2%80%99-rights-is-rallying-cry-for-lawmakers/

Thank You, Vytautas

Obama’s Approval Rating Drops To 46 Per Cent

A new poll by Gallup showed Obama’s approval rating at a record low of 46 per cent since taking office.

Independents and Republicans have grown wary of health care reform as an expensive government venture.

Obama set Democratic leaders in Congress a deadline of March 18 to coral the votes necessary to pass health care without any support from Republicans, by using a procedure known as budget reconciliation.

He was due to leave on the same day for Guam, Indonesia and Australia. Indonesia, the largest Muslim country in the world where Obama spent four years as a boy.

But with the future of health care change now in critical condition the White House has decided Obama needs to stay in Washington to twist arms in Congress. A likely target will be up to 12 Democrats who say they will not vote for the proposed bill because it doesn’t prevent federal funds being used for abortions.

Polls continue to show more people are against the sweeping changes he is proposing than for. His plans would be financed by slowing the growth of government-run health care for the elderly and raising taxes.

Two leading Democratic pollsters yesterday criticized Obama for being deaf to public opinion. Patrick Caddell and Doug Schoen, who conducted polls for former presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton respectively, wrote in the Washington Post that the “blind persistence in the face of reality” of Obama and his advisers ran the risk of “unmitigated disaster in November”, when midterm elections will be held.

White House Land Grab

One Man’s Thoughts Has Moved To

http://www.patriotthoughts.com

You can read this article at:

http://www.patriotthoughts.com/2010/03/11/white-house-land-grab/

Thank You, Vytautas

Paul Ryan vs Obama

One Man’s Thoughts Has Moved To

http://www.patriotthoughts.com

You can read this article at:

http://www.patriotthoughts.com/2010/03/04/paul-ryan-vs-obama/

Thank You, Vytautas

Sen. Bayh Advocates Electoral “Shock” To Fix Broken System

In an interview on MSNBC, Sen. Evan Bayh declared the American political system “dysfunctional,” riddled with “brain-dead partisanship” and permanent campaigning. Flatly denying any possibility that he’d seek the presidency or any other higher office, Bayh argued that the American people needed to deliver a “shock” to Congress by voting incumbents out en masse and replacing them with people interested in reforming the process and governing for the good of the people, rather than deep-pocketed special-interest groups.

He stated repeatedly that members of his own party should be more willing to settle for a compromise rather than holding out for perfection. “Sometimes half a loaf is better than none,” Bayh insisted.

It’s no secret that the Senate has struggled to take action this year. With the two major parties unusually far apart in their substantive proposals for the direction of the country, even finding half a loaf to agree on has been difficult. Though the Democrats have had a substantial majority in the Senate for the last year, Republicans have escalated their threats to use filibusters to force Democrats to come up with 60 votes to pass any major legislation. And after Scott Brown’s election to the Senate last month gave Republicans a 41st seat, health-care reform and other Democratic goals were stopped dead in their tracks.

Bayh blamed the current atmosphere of intense partisanship on the need for Senators to constantly campaign to be reelected to another six-year term. Citing his father, a liberal Senator in the ’60s and ’70s, he noted that “back in the day they used to have the saying: ‘You campaign for 2 years and you legislate for 4.’ Now you campaign for 6!” He noted that the need for constant fundraising made it nearly impossible to focus on passing legislation.

Frustration over the increasing amount of money being spent on political campaigns isn’t exactly a new thing, as spending by candidates in the 2008 presidential election nearly quadrupled the amount of money spent by candidates in the 2000 election. Additionally, winners of House races in 2000 spent an average of $849,158 to do so, while House winners in 2008 spent an average of $1,372,591. Enhancing the concerns of many has been a recent Supreme Court decision to strike down the country’s existing campaign finance laws. Put simply, the ruling opens the door for an even greater influence of money by allowing corporations spend money directly on campaigns.

Meanwhile, voter frustration is high, making the fight for campaign cash all the more crucial to politicians hoping to remain in office. A recent poll found that 44% of Americans believe incumbents should be voted out of office.

There doesn’t appear to be any significant momentum at this time behind efforts to change the rules that govern passing legislation or Congress’s need to constantly campaign and fundraise. With an election year beginning, it’s also unlikely that congressional leaders will begin to see eye to eye more often on major legislation.

Perhaps a “shock” is indeed called for in order to change that.

The Lawyers’ Party

The Democratic Party has become the Lawyers’ Party. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton are lawyers. Bill Clinton and Michelle Obama are lawyers. John Edwards, the other former Democrat candidate for president, is a lawyer and so is his wife Elizabeth. Every Democrat nominee since 1984 went to law school (although Gore did not graduate.) Every Democrat vice presidential nominee since 1976, except for Lloyd Bentsen, went to law school. Look at the Democrat Party in Congress: the Majority Leader in each house is a lawyer.

The Republican Party is different. President Bush and Vice President Cheney were not lawyers, but businessmen. The leaders of the Republican Revolution were not lawyers. Newt Gingrich was a history professor; Tom Delay was an exterminator; and Dick Armey was an economist. House Minority Leader Boehner was a plastic manufacturer, not a lawyer. The former Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist is a heart surgeon.

Who was the last Republican president who was a lawyer? Gerald Ford, who left office thirty-one years ago and who barely won the Republican nomination as a sitting president, running against Ronald Reagan in 1976. The Republican Party is made up of real people doing real work. The Democratic Party is made up of lawyers. Democrats mock and scorn men who create wealth, like Bush and Cheney, or who heal the sick like Frist, or who immerse themselves in history like Gingrich.

The Lawyers’ Party sees these sorts of people, who provide goods and services that people want, as the enemies of America. And so we have seen the procession of official enemies in the eyes of the Lawyers’ Party grow. Against whom do Hillary and Obama rail? Pharmaceutical companies, oil companies, hospitals, manufacturers, fast food restaurant chains, large retail businesses, bankers and anyone producing anything of value in our nation.

This is the natural consequence of viewing everything through the eyes of lawyers. Lawyers solve problems by successfully representing their clients, in this case the American people. Lawyers seek to have new laws passed, they seek to win lawsuits, they press appellate courts to overturn precedent, and lawyers always parse language to favor their side.

Confined to the narrow practice of law, that is fine. But it is an awful way to govern a great nation. When politicians as lawyers begin to view some Americans as clients and other Americans as opposing parties, then the role of the legal system in our life becomes all consuming. Some Americans become “adverse parties” of our very government. We are not all litigants in some vast social class action suit. We are citizens of a republic which promises us a great deal of freedom from laws, from courts, and from lawyers.

Today, we are drowning in laws, we are contorted by judicial decisions, we are driven to distraction by omnipresent lawyers in all parts of our once private lives. America has a place for laws and lawyers, but that place is modest and reasonable, not vast and unchecked. When the most important decision for our next president is whom he will appoint to the Supreme Court, the role of lawyers and the law in America is too big. When lawyers use criminal prosecution as a continuation of politics by other means, as happened in the lynching of Scooter Libby and Tom Delay, then the power of lawyers in America is too great. When House Democrats sue America in order to hamstring our efforts to learn what our enemies are planning to do to use, then the role of litigation in America has become crushing.

We cannot expect the Lawyers’ Party to provide real change, real reform or real hope in America. Most Americans know that a republic in which every major government action must be blessed by nine unelected judges is not what Washington intended in 1789. Most Americans grasp that we cannot fight a war when ACLU lawsuits snap at the heels of our defenders. Most Americans intuit that more lawyers and judges will not restore declining moral values or spark the spirit of enterprise in our economy.

Perhaps Americans will understand that change cannot be brought to our nation by those lawyers who already largely dictate American society and business. Perhaps Americans will see that hope does not come from the mouths of lawyers but from personal dreams nourished by hard work. Perhaps Americans will embrace the truth that more lawyers with more power will only make our problems worse.

http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/03/the_lawyers_party.html

Tea Party Convention Plans National Organizing Strategy for Elections

The first ever Tea Party Convention has attracted a sellout crowd of a thousand activists from as far away as Hawaii (and media from as far away as Japan) to the Gaylord Opryland Convention Center.

Volunteers here intend to propose a series of broad “First Principles” which have already been generally embraced by most Tea Party chapters around the country. They include: fiscal responsibility, upholding the constitution, and national security.

Prospective political candidates will be expected to support the Republican National Committee platform, though without any specific litmus or purity test.

If a particular candidate meets the proposed Tea Party criteria he or she would be eligible for fundraising and grassroots Tea Party support.

Once elected to office, members would be required to join a Congressional Tea Party Caucus, attend regular meetings and be held accountable for the votes they cast. Those who stray from the Tea Party path would risk losing its support and a likely re-election challenge.

These are simply proposals from activists in Tennessee who put this convention together and who say they recognize that disparate Tea Party groups nationwide have varied interests and ideas of their own.

Organizers suggest creating political action committees, a large scale fundraising apparatus, and starting the development of a national network of pro bono attorneys to deal with the myriad legal-political riddles that such undertakings face in campaigns and elections.

Palin ‘Would Be Willing’ to Take On Obama in 2012

Sarah Palin has Obama in her sights, telling FoxNews.com she “would be willing” to challenge him in the 2012 presidential race.

The former Alaska governor, in an interview Saturday on the sidelines of the National Tea Party Convention in Nashville, said Obama’s “lack of experience” has held him back his first year in office and that she would put her credentials up against his any day.

“I would be willing to if I believe that it’s right for the country,” Palin said when asked if she would run for president in 2012.

She qualified the statement, adding that she sees “many” other potential candidates who are “in as strong or stronger position than I am to take on the White House and if they’re in a better position than I in three years, I’ll support them.”

But the former GOP vice presidential nominee told “Fox News Sunday”: “I won’t close the door that perhaps could be open for me in the future.”

Palin is doing more than simply dipping her toe in the water with tentative talk of presidential aspirations. Since unexpectedly leaving the Alaska Governor’s Mansion last year, she’s formed a political action committee, she’s started endorsing and supporting candidates in the Republican primaries, she’s published a book and she’s been agitating the administration on a regular basis.

She delivered the keynote address Saturday at the tea party convention, using it to hammer Obama as soft on terrorism. When convention organizer Judson Phillips mentioned the idea of “President Palin” in a question-and-answer session afterward, audience members leapt to their feet and burst into a chant of “Run, Sarah, Run.”

In the near-term, Palin said she is going to focus her energy on the upcoming GOP primaries, and that she may support “hundreds” of candidates in the months ahead.

“I do want competition to allow the cream of the crop to rise (in the GOP contests),” Palin said, adding that her support would translate into everything from donations to campaign rallies. “There are hundreds of candidates on local, state and on the national level that hopefully we’ll be able to help.”

Palin recently endorsed Rand Paul, the son of Texas Rep. Ron Paul, in the GOP primary for U.S. Senate in Kentucky. She said she was attracted to his limited government platform and that she’s already donated to the campaign.

Asked which other races she’s focusing on, Palin, who’s a Fox News analyst, said she’ll “do whatever I can to help” the Republican nominee, whoever he or she is, against Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in Nevada.

“If the election were today, Reid … would go down,” Palin said.

However, she said she doesn’t have any favorites in the Republican primary — and dismissed the idea that she fancies herself a political kingmaker.

“That’s going too far because I do not have that power nor desire,” she said.

During her Saturday keynote address and in her interview with FoxNews.com, Palin pointed to the tea party movement as the surging political force that will make waves in the upcoming elections.

She said tea party support will “absolutely” be critical for candidates in some districts and that the GOP should not be scared of the movement.

“It absolutely helps (the Republican Party) and those who are fearful about it and those who are trying to stir up controversy about it — they obviously are apprehensive in terms of the message getting out there, and those people are gonna get thumped because this is a good message,” she said. “Who can argue this movement?”

As Palin aligns herself more closely with the evolving tea party movement, some surveys suggest she could have the support to eventually mount a competitive presidential run — despite tough questions raised during the 2008 campaign about her experience and qualifications. A poll last week had her leading, by a few points, the pack of potential GOP candidates. The Research 2000 poll also showed Republican voters viewing her as more qualified to be president than Obama by a 4-1 margin.

Asked whether she believes she’s more qualified than Obama, Palin showed little hesitation.

“In the campaign, we tried to bring attention to the fact that Obama had really not a lot of experience. And I do say that my executive experience, as an administrator, as a team manager if you will was, and so was John McCain’s as a matter of fact, was stronger and we had more experience than Barack Obama did in terms of managing huge multi-billion dollar budgets and thousands of employees … and that hasn’t changed,” Palin said.

“I think that President Obama with all due respect, his lack of experience is really made manifest in the way that decisions are made in the White House today,” she added.

Palin slammed Obama in her Nashville speech for his foreign and national security policies. And with health care reform on the ropes, she told FoxNews.com it’s time to pull the plug.

“I sure wish that the present tool being used to reform health care would die, but I don’t trust as far as I can throw them some of the people who are saying ok, we’ll slow down,” she said. “What they’re working on today there in Congress and the White House, it needs to die.”

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/02/07/palin-willing-obama/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%253A+foxnews%252Fpolitics+%2528Text+-+Politics%2529&utm_content=My+Yahoo

Proposed 28th Amendment to the United States Constitution

One Man’s Thoughts Has Moved To

http://www.patriotthoughts.com

For too long we have been too complacent about the workings of Congress.

Many citizens have no idea that members of Congress could retire with the same pay after only one term, that they don’t pay into Social Security, that they specifically exempted themselves from many of the laws they have passed (such as being exempt from any fear of prosecution for sexual harassment) while ordinary citizens must live under those laws.  The latest is to exempt themselves from the Healthcare Reform that is being considered in all of its forms.

Somehow, that doesn’t seem logical.  We do not have an elite that is above the law. I truly don’t care if they are Democrat, Republican, Independent or whatever.  The self-serving must stop. This is a good way to do that.

You can read this article at:

http://www.patriotthoughts.com/2010/02/06/proposed-28th-amendment-to-the-united-states-constitution/

Thank You, Vytautas